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It’s so convenient to turn advanced machines into villains.

The reality, of course, is they are uniting and have been for a while, now.

But the Internet of Things is here to give us more freedom, not less.

The automated cars have already arrived and will become more versatile with each model year.

As with everything else technological, the pace of development is accelerating rapidly. Companies are seemingly creating products as quickly as futurists can imagine them.

High-end homes already incorporate these features or will soon.

Take Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates‘ Seattle-area mansion, Xanadu 2.0:

Xanadu 2.0

Its features include Internet of Things amenities like these:

  • Guests are given an interactive pin that adjusts room temperature and lighting preferences that follow them from room to room. What’s more, speakers embedded behind wallpaper allows music to follow them around, too.
  • The house is built into its surroundings to regulate temperature more efficiently.
  • $80,000 worth of computer screens situated around the house display guests’ favorite paintings or photographs, which are stored on storage devices worth $150,000 and appear when the guests enter.

And that’s a crucial point, because as James Gagliardi — VP of Product & Innovation at Digital River — contends, this technology is rapidly advancing to an era he calls the Commerce of Things:

[It’s] a new paradigm of business in which connected objects will mediate commercial transactions by themselves.

The objects we use will start to free us from the tedious and costly business of replenishing the things in our lives that get used up or worn out or spoiled. They will do this by themselves, with our permission and on our behalf, in order to make our lives better.

Imagine taking a hint from John Lawson or Vanessa Simpkins about big profits from small stuff and opening a Shopify store featuring Internet of Things items that monitor and/or facilitate the Commerce of Things.

Gagliardi even gave an example of one in his essay. And he became an investor.

This is ground-floor stuff, and it merits watching now, finding a niche, making a plan, and taking action.

There’s no better way to ensure you’re in command instead of the machines.

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