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There’s nothing that puts a stamp of authority and uniqueness on your marketing message better than your own words.

These days, even if you’re unsure of yourself as a writer, you can use software that may not transform you into the next Hemingway, but it’ll smooth out enough of your input to produce a professional narration.

The point is, the value of your original content is greater than one deployment.

This is why the practice of repurposing content is so popular among successful e-commerce sites.

After all, you’ve done the heavy lifting by composing your original message. The task of rearranging its elements takes a fraction of the time and can pack as powerful a punch.

repurposing content

Amazingly, there’s one aspect of this technique that is often overlooked: the status of the original article itself.

In an ideal world, everything we publish would be evergreen, ie- timeless. However, sometimes a current topic is too pertinent to be memorialized in that manner.

A prime example of this is video usage.

On this site, we often include third-party videos to underscore the ubiquity of a given topic. At our snarky sports site, The Daily Player, current video highlights are an essential ingredient to its programing.

One occupational hazard, though, is that videos often get pulled from platforms such as YouTube and Vimeo, leaving an annoying visual image for readers who discover the article well past its publish date:

youtube video graphics

Replacing them is paramount, either with a similar video or a related graphic. After all, published content can linger in cyberspace forever, and these negative images look worse on your site than a pimple does on your nose.

Search engines like Google place a high value on internal links, so keeping archived articles fresh means they’re ready for inclusion in your current work.

Furthermore, new readers to your established site often become interested enough to review your archives. Subtly show you’re there for them in the long run by maintaining your informational inventory.

All you really need to do is set a review schedule. Select a maintenance day each month to check your items that were published three, six, nine, and twelve months ago:

  • Evergreen any dated text, and
  • Update any pulled videos.

This task will rarely take more than an hour’s time per month, and it’s worth doing. After all, if your original work is going to live forever, you’ll often benefit by keeping it effective forever.

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