SHARE
Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestShare on VKEmail this to someonePrint this page

If you’ve visited our site for any length of time, you’ve surely noticed our three-step mantra for achieving the Dot Com lifestyle:

  • Create a plan, something that you’ll enjoy doing;
  • Find a mentor, someone who’s successful and interests you; and
  • Automate as much of your daily business tasks as possible.

In most cases, one fundamental purpose of automation is to attract visitors to your site. For most aspiring e-commerce entrepreneurs, there’s a pressing temptation to turn on the traffic taps, big time.

A tried-&-true method of gaining visitors is a search engine optimization (SEO) technique known as link building.

Here’s a dude who has the basics sorted:

The takeaway is links that add value to your visitors are what you’re seeking.

While that may sound obvious, it sometimes becomes obscured in sales pitches for automated link building software that promises big results in a hurry. This can be done, but sometimes, they delve into Black Hat territory, ie- shortcuts that aren’t necessarily approved by the guardians of cyberspace such as search engines and browsers.

Putting it mildly, search engines such as Google aren’t very excited about Black Hat. Remember, they’re in the business of adding value, too. Poor search results won’t aid their cause.

Most of their algorithm adjustments — such as Penguin and Panda — are attempts to slap, or penalize, sites that resort to those practices.

The result essentially shuts off their search engine as a traffic source.

Link building is but one of many elements in Google’s algorithm that determines a site’s PageRank.

Recently, Google saw fit to refine its policies on automated link building.

It issued a proclamation that not only warns content producers but also publishers that if they don’t have a logical relationship with the links they’re generating, they’re on notice.

Basically, Google appears to be applying the same scrutiny to link building that the Federal Trade Commission does with MLMs:

  • If a verifiable quality product is the main purpose of the venture, it’s legal, but
  • If the recruitment of prospects is the main purpose with the product serving only as an excuse, then it’s a pyramid scheme.

As a result, think long and hard about offering guest posts in bulk, receiving guest post offers out of the blue, and utilizing software that purports to put your site into private blog networks (PBNs).

Besides, there are simpler, more efficient, and natural White Hat methods of building links that do a better job of propagating your message and enhancing your authority.

As well, the tech world keeps developing exciting new avenues for getting your message out there.

Frankly, the Holy Grail for search engine developers is to make the process more human-responsive.

So you could simply do what we do: just be your socially involved self and possibly add a bit of code.

Then, let the spiders come.

Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestShare on VKEmail this to someonePrint this page